Eye Care? We Care!

OTHER SERVICES

Red, Pink or Sore Eyes? 

Did you know your optometrist can help you with red eyes, pink eye, or sore eyes?  You don't have to go to your primary care physician for help with these issues.

We are ready to look after ALL of your eye care neds in one location. In addition to the services you already rely on us for such as routine eye exams, contact lenses. designer frames and eyeglasses - think of your Optometrist first for:

  • sore, red, or itchy eyes

  • treatment of "pink eye" and other bacterial infections

  • removal of foreign bodies from the eye (such as wood or metal)

  • treatment of eye allergies or burns

  • emergency eye care

This is convenient and cost effective for your whole family and you can be sure you are receiving the attention of an eye care specialist.

Management of Ocular Diseases Including Glaucoma, Macular Degeneration, and Cataracts

Our Eye Care Clinic makes it a policy to ensure that all staff members are up-to-date on the latest technology and techniques to make your visit as comfortable and effective as possible. As optometric technology changes, it is even more important to select an eye doctor who has all the right optometry qualifications and follows the latest developments in eye care.

Utilizing cutting edge technology we are diagnosing and managing, with greater precision, diseases like Glaucoma, Macular degeneration and Cataracts. Earlier and more precise diagnosis means earlier treatment and better outcomes. We are taking an aggressive approach to diseases that previously had few treatment options. Great advances have been made in the treatment of these diseases.

Cataract Surgery

  • Cataract surgery removes the natural lens of the eye that has become opaque, and replaces it with a synthetic lens.

Glaucoma Testing and Treatment

  • Glaucoma testing involves measuring internal eye pressure and a detailed scan of the retina for signs of disease.

Macular Degeneration Treatment

  • Macular degeneration is an eye disease that affects the portion of the eye responsible for processing fine detail and providing sharp central vision (called the macula).  

 

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Dry Eye Treatment

Dry eyes result from the chronic lack of lubrication and moisture on the surface of the eye, which can cause minor irritations, an inability to wear contact lenses and an increased risk of corneal inflammation and eye infections.

Dry eyes or dry eye syndrome (DES) is an ongoing condition that treatments may be unable to cure. But the symptoms of dry eye—including dryness, scratchiness and burning—can usually be successfully managed.

Your optometrist may recommend artificial tears, which are lubricating eyedrops that may alleviate the dry, scratching feeling and foreign body sensation of dry eye. Prescription eye drops for dry eye go one step further: they help increase your tear production.

If you wear contact lenses, be aware that many artificial tears cannot be used during contact lens wear. You may need to remove your lenses before using the drops. Wait 15 minutes or longer (check the label) before reinserting them. For mild dry eye, contact lens rewetting drops may be sufficient to make your eyes feel better, but the effect is usually only temporary. Switching to another lens brand could also help.

Check the label, but better yet, check with your doctor before buying any over-the-counter eye drops. Your eye doctor will know which formulas are effective and long-lasting and which are not, as well as which eye drops will work with your contact lenses. 

To reduce the effects of sun, wind and dust on dry eyes, wear sunglasses when outdoors. Wraparound styles offer the best protection. 

Indoors, an air cleaner can filter out dust and other particles from the air, while a humidifier adds moisture to air that's too dry because of air conditioning or heating. 

For more significant cases of dry eye, your eye doctor may recommend punctal plugs. These tiny devices are inserted in ducts in your lids to slow the drainage of tears away from your eyes, thereby keeping your eyes more moist.

Doctors sometimes recommend special nutritional supplements containing certain essential fatty acids to decrease dry eye symptoms. Drinking more water may also relieve symptoms.

If medications are the cause of dry eyes, discontinuing the drug generally resolves the problem. But in this case, the benefits of the drug must be weighed against the side effect of dry eyes. Sometimes switching to a different type of medication alleviates the dry eye symptoms while keeping the needed treatment. In any case, never switch or discontinue your medications without consulting with your doctor first. 

Treating any underlying eyelid disease, such as blepharitis, helps as well. This may call for antibiotic or steroid drops, plus frequent eyelid scrubs with an antibacterial shampoo.
 
If you are considering LASIK, be aware that dry eyes may disqualify you for the surgery, at least until your dry eye condition is successfully treated. Dry eyes increase your risk for poor healing after LASIK, so most surgeons will want to treat the dry eyes first, to ensure a good LASIK outcome. This goes for other types of vision correction surgery, as well.
 
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Stages of Vision Development

Most parents believe that vision is something that just develops naturally, and therefore does not need to be checked until school-age when it has already fully developed. The truth is that vision is learned – and the most critical stages of vision development occur in the first year of life.

AGE

VISION

At Birth

  • Focus on objects less than a foot away, such as mom's face when nursing

By 3 Months

  • Follows moving objects and reaches for things

  • It is normal for a child's eyes to not always track together for first 6-8 weeks.

By 6 Months

  • Both eyes should focus equally; brainwaves can demonstrate ability to see 20/20 detail

  • Eye/body coordination skills develop

By 9 Months

  • Eye contact begins to replace physical contact

  • Eye/body coordination skills develop further

By 12 Months

  • Uses both eyes to judge distance

 
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LASIK Surgery

The doctors at our Eye Care Clinic have extensive experience in the pre-operative evaluation and post-operative care of LASIK and other vision correction procedures. By far, LASIK is currently the most popular vision-correcting or "refractive" surgery available. But there are other options as well. We will help you find the ideal solution for your problem and partner with the best surgeon to perform your procedure.

Introduction to LASIK

LASIK is the most commonly performed refractive surgery procedure. You may hear people calling it "LASIX," but the correct name is LASIK, which is short for "laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis."

Why is it so popular? LASIK has advantages over other vision correction procedures, including a relative lack of pain afterward and the fact that good vision usually is achieved by the very next day.

An instrument called a microkeratome is used in LASIK eye surgery to create a thin, circular flap in the cornea. Another, newer way of making the flap is with a laser.

The surgeon folds the hinged flap back out of the way, then removes some corneal tissue underneath using an excimer laser. The excimer laser uses a cool ultraviolet light beam to precisely remove ("ablate") very tiny bits of tissue from the cornea to reshape it.

When the cornea is reshaped in the right way, it works better to focus light into the eye and onto the retina, providing clearer vision than before. The flap is then laid back in place, covering the area where the corneal tissue was removed.

Both nearsighted and farsighted people can benefit from the LASIK procedure. With nearsighted people, the goal is to flatten the too-steep cornea; with farsighted people, a steeper cornea is desired. Excimer lasers also can correct astigmatism by smoothing an irregular cornea into a more normal shape.

 

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Refractive Surgery Co-Management

Our doctors will evaluate your eyes and discuss your visual goals to help determine if you are an appropriate candidate for LASIK, PRK or Cataract Refractive Technology. If you have appropriate goals and there are no contraindications for the procedure, we will recommend a pre-operative evaluation to determine suitability for refractive surgery. This evaluation includes:

  • Counseling on refractive surgery options

  • Eye dominancy testing

  • Review of eye history and refractive stability

  • Medical evaluation of the cornea and eye

  • Current Refraction Status

If after the pre-operative evaluation, the decision is made to proceed with surgery, your information will be forwarded to the surgeon, a pre surgery consult with a surgeon will be scheduled. Post-operative management will be provided by our doctors, and includes multiple visits over a period from the date of surgery to include medical evaluation and management of the vision and corneal healing. Evaluation of any additional needs such as reading glasses, sunglasses, or enhancement laser procedures is also included.

 

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Eye Emergencies

Eye injuries range from the very minor such as getting soap in your eye, to the catastrophic such as chemical exposures or lacerations, which could result in permanent loss of vision. Find out when to seek immediate medical care.

When to Seek Medical Care

In most cases, if you have continuing symptoms of pain, visual disturbance, or bleeding, you should go to an ophthalmologist (a medical doctor who specializes in eye care and surgery).

In general, if you are not sure if you have a serious eye injury, call your ophthalmologist for advice.

Calling your ophthalmologist may be helpful in the following circumstances:

Chemical exposures: If you are not sure if the exposure is potentially serious, you have washed out your eye, and you have few symptoms, then your ophthalmologist may be able to help you decide whether or not you should be seen immediately.

Subconjunctival hemorrhage: If you are not sure that you have this condition, your ophthalmologist may be able to help with the diagnosis. This condition does not require immediate medical attention.

Continuing pain and decreased vision after an eye injury can be warning signs that require prompt medical attention. If you have an ophthalmologist, he or she may be able to take care of you in the office. Otherwise, go to a hospital's emergency department.

The following conditions should be seen promptly by an ophthalmologist or in the emergency department:

Chemical exposures: If the substance was known to be caustic, immediate medical evaluation by either an ophthalmologist or in the emergency department is needed, regardless of symptoms. Acids and alkalis are the worst and require immediate attention. If the substance is not dangerous, such as soap or suntan lotion, a visit to the emergency department is not necessary, but a visit to the ophthalmologist's office may be helpful to alleviate any remaining symptoms. When in doubt, seek medical attention.

Lacerations: Cuts that affect the eyelid margins (where the eyelashes are) or the eyeball itself need immediate medical attention. Foreign bodies that are not removed with gentle washing should be evaluated by an ophthalmologist.

Solar retinopathy: Evaluation by an ophthalmologist is necessary. This is one condition where there is little that can be done in the emergency department.

 

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Low Vision 

Low vision is the term used to describe reduced eyesight that cannot be fully corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses or eye surgery. The primary causes of low vision are eye diseases, but low vision also can be inherited or caused by an eye or brain injury.

A person with low vision is not blind: they have some useful sight. But the degree of their visual impairment can make daily tasks, such as reading and driving, difficult or impossible. Though children as well as adults can be visually impaired, low vision is mostly a problem that afflicts seniors. Vision loss after a lifetime of good eyesight can be very traumatic, leading to frustration and depression.

Many people who develop eye problems that cause low vision lose their jobs. According to Lighthouse International, among visually impaired Americans of ages 21 to 64, only 43.7% are employed. Among normally-sighted people in this age group, 80% are employed.

Not being able to drive safely, read quickly, or easily see images on a television or computer screen can cause people with low vision to feel shut off from the world. They may be unable to get around town independently, earn a living or even shop for food and other necessities. Some visually impaired people become completely dependent on friends and relatives, while others suffer alone.

Thankfully, in many cases, people with impaired vision can be helped by low vision devices, which include eyeglass-mounted magnifiers, handheld magnifiers and telescopes, and stand-alone magnifiers. There are many ingenious low vision devices and strategies that can help visually-impaired individuals get the most out of their remaining sight and, in many cases, continue to live independently.

If you have hazy or blurred vision, light sensitivity, loss of peripheral vision, night blindness, a need for more light than before, unusual floaters or spots, or difficulty reading - your first step is to see an eyecare professional for a complete exam.

These could be the first signs of a serious eye disease such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, or retinitis pigmentosa. Or, they could mean you are developing a cataract that needs removal. Whatever the case, it's wise to take action before further vision loss occurs.

If your eye doctor finds you have a vision loss that cannot be corrected with eyewear, medical treatment or surgery, they can refer you to a low vision specialist. Usually an optometrist, a low vision specialist can evaluate the degree and type of vision loss you have, prescribe appropriate low vision aids, and help you learn how to use them.

The low vision specialist can also recommend non-optical adaptive devices, such as large-print books, audio tapes, special light fixtures and signature guides for signing checks and documents. If necessary, your eye doctor or low vision specialist can also refer you to a counselor to help you cope with your loss of vision.

Source: Low Vision, article by AllAboutVision.com. ©2009 Access Media Group LLC.  All rights reserved. Reproduction other than for one-time personal use is strictly prohibited.

 

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Sports and Specialty Eyewear

Fitting Sports eyewear can give you the performance edge you're seeking for just about any sport (tennis, racquetball, etc.) or recreational activity (hunting, fishing, etc.). It can also provide the safety and eye protection you need as well.

Seeing "20/20" isn't the only measure of good vision. Visual acuity (20/20, etc.) is certainly important. But good vision involves a set of several skills, including depth perception, peripheral visual field awareness, eye-hand coordination and more.

All these vision skills are extremely important in sports, whether you play golf, soccer, baseball, basketball or racquet sports.

If you want to perform your best in sports, you may benefit from seeing an eyecare practitioner who specializes in sports vision - even if you already have 20/20 vision. This is because a typical eye exam usually doesn't include tests of visual skills important to sports performance.

Sports vision testing is more extensive, and can be tailored to the specific sport you are interested in. During a sports vision exam, it's not unusual for the examiner to include tests to evaluate how well you see while you are moving around outdoors and interacting with other objects or players.

Many professional athletes work on their sports vision, but so do high school and college athletes, recreational golfers, tennis players and even billiards players. Some non-sports professionals also benefit from the same vision training, including law enforcement personnel and pilots.

When you visit a sports vision specialist, he or she will probably give you a complete eye exam and will ask you questions about your activities. More testing will determine your sports-related needs. These tests may include the use of three-dimensional, holographic images so you can react to them as in real life, and computerized tests that measure your reaction time and eye-hand coordination.

Depending on your particular sport, actual on-field measuring of your reactions to various sports situations may be included. Many sports vision specialists will attend your games or matches to help them evaluate your vision performance. They may also study videos of your games.

You may need only one visit to a specialist to set you on your way to better visual skills for sports. However, in many cases, a comprehensive sports vision training program is a better option to help you develop your sports vision skills so they become second nature.

Source: Sports Vision Specialists, article by AllAboutVision.com. ©2009 Access Media Group LLC.  All rights reserved. Reproduction other than for one-time personal use is strictly prohibited.

 

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Visual Field Testing 

Measures the quality of your side vision (peripheral vision). Usually involves covering one eye and focusing the other on a fixed point in front of you, while describing what you can see on the “periphery” of your vision.

A visual field test measures how much 'side' vision you have. It is a straightforward test, painless, and does not involve eye drops. Essentially lights are flashed on, and you have to press a button whenever you see the light. Your head is kept still and you have to place your chin on a chin rest. The lights are bright or dim at different stages of the test. Some of the flashes are purely to check you are concentrating.

Each eye is tested separately and the entire test takes 15-45 minutes. Your optometrist may ask only for a driving license visual field test, which takes 5-10 minutes. If you have just asked for a driving test or the clinic doctor advised you have one, you will be informed of the result by the clinic doctor, in writing, in a few weeks. 
 
Normally the test is carried out by a computerised machine, called a Humphrey. Occasionally the manual test has to be used, a Goldman. For each test you have to look at a central point then press a buzzer each time you see the light.  
 
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Glaucoma Testing 

Glaucoma testing involves measuring internal eye pressure and a detailed scan of the retina for signs of disease.

What Is a Glaucoma Test?

Glaucoma is the generalized name for a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve of the eye, preventing the eye from sending accurate visual information to the brain. Glaucoma tests are designed to test your eyes for one of the key symptoms of the disease—increased eye pressure—however only a comprehensive eye exam can reveal whether or not you have glaucoma. Increased pressure inside the eye is often a key indicator of glaucoma, though not exclusively so. Eye doctors can use a number of tests for eye pressure, but will, by default, check for signs of glaucoma as part of a detailed examination of the retina—the light sensitive area at the back of the eye responsible for processing images.

How Does Glaucoma Testing Work?

A glaucoma test is usually part of a routine eye exam. Both types of glaucoma tests measure internal pressure of the eye.

One glaucoma test involves measuring what happens when a puff of air is blown across the surface of the eye. (A puff test) Another test uses a special device (in conjunction with eye-numbing drops) to “touch” the surface of the eye to measure eye pressure.

While increased eye pressure is a key indicator of the disease, it does not necessarily mean you have a glaucoma diagnosis. In fact, the only way to detect glaucoma is to have a detailed, comprehensive eye exam that often includes dilation of the pupils.

So “true” glaucoma testing actually involves examining the retina and optic nerve at the back of the eye for signs of the disease.

 
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Cataract Surgery 

Cataract surgery removes the natural lens of the eye that has become opaque, and replaces it with a synthetic lens.

Cataracts is a disease of the eye that results in the clouding of the lens of the eyeball. Cataracts prevent clear images from appearing on the eye’s retina; causing mild, moderate, even severe blurred vision. Watch a short video about cataracts now.

Typically an eye disorder associated with aging (over half of the people in America over age 80 have either had a cataract or cataract surgery), cataracts generally occur later in life as the lens structure within the human eye changes and gets older.

Cataract Surgery 

Cataract surgery is the removal of the natural lens of the eye (also called "crystalline lens") that has developed an opacification, which is referred to as a cataract. Metabolic changes of the crystalline lens fibers over the time lead to the development of the cataract and loss of transparency, causing impairment or loss of vision. During cataract surgery, a patient's cloudy natural lens is removed and replaced with a synthetic lens to restore the lens's transparency. 

Following surgical removal of the natural lens, an artificial intraocular lens implant is inserted (eye surgeons say that the lens is "implanted"). Cataract surgery is generally performed by an ophthalmologist (eye surgeon) in an ambulatory (rather than inpatient) setting, in a surgical center or hospital, using local anesthesia (either topical, peribulbar, or retrobulbar), usually causing little or no discomfort to the patient. Well over 90% of operations are successful in restoring useful vision, with a low complication rate. Day care, high volume, minimally invasive, small incision phacoemulsification with quick post-op recovery has become the standard of care in cataract surgery all over the world.  

 

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FIND US

Puzzled Looks Optometrists & Opticians

48 935 Marine Drive,

North Vancouver, BC V7P 1S3

Phone. 604-990-6909

Fax. 604-990-6910

Email. info@puzzledlooks.ca

 

 

Working Hours

 

Monday

10:00 AM

6:00 PM

Tuesday

10:00 AM

6:00 PM

Wednesday

10:00 AM

6:00 PM

Thursday

10:00 AM

9:00 PM

Friday

10:00 AM

9:00 PM

Saturday

9:30 AM

6:00 PM

Sunday

11:00 AM

 6:00 PM